Winter 2009 ESCC/Internet2 Joint Techs

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Unraveling Network Configuration Management

Time 02/02/09 02:20PM-02:40PM

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Session Abstract

Change is dear to the heart of every network and thus every network operator. A Network's requirements are constantly being changed to reflect THE CONSTANT evolution of the internet and usage patterns. Although the network's implementation is readily modified, network documentation is rarely updated to reflect the newly implement requirements. This lack of documentation, in conjunction with low level granularity of the configuration commands, forces unfamiliar operators to expend more time while making future changes. The lack of documentation also makes the network more vulnerable to misconfigurations due to inconsistent changes.

We have developed a set of tools that reverse engineers documentation for a network from its configuration files. Our tools extract documentation in the following three ways: 1) high level policies in the form of constraints placed on communication between users 2) related configurations commands across files in the form of mined configuration templates, and finally 3) dependent configuration commands within and across files in the form of referential links.

We have run our tools on several educational networks with varying levels of success. We would also love to have you run our tools and tell us what you think. Any suggestions and feedback on how our tool might be more applicable to your configuration needs are welcomed.

Speakers

Speaker Theophilus Benson University of Wisconsin

Presentation Media

media item thumbnail Unraveling Network Configuration Management (pdf)

Speaker Theophilus Benson University of Wisconsin

Speaker Tom Vest Eyeconomics

Session Media

media item thumbnail Unraveling Network Configuration Management Netcast Archive Change is dear to the heart of every network and thus every network operator. A Network's requirements are constantly being changed to reflect THE CONSTANT evolution of the internet and usage patterns. Although the network's implementation is readily modified, network documentation is rarely updated to reflect the newly implement requirements. This lack of documentation, in conjunction with low level granularity of the configuration commands, forces unfamiliar operators to expend more time while making future changes. The lack of documentation also makes the network more vulnerable to misconfigurations due to inconsistent changes. We have developed a set of tools that reverse engineers documentation for a network from its configuration files. Our tools extract documentation in the following three ways: 1) high level policies in the form of constraints placed on communication between users 2) related configurations commands across files in the form of mined configuration templates, and finally 3) dependent configuration commands within and across files in the form of referential links. We have run our tools on several educational networks with varying levels of success. We would also love to have you run our tools and tell us what you think. Any suggestions and feedback on how our tool might be more applicable to your configuration needs are welcomed. media item thumbnail Unraveling Network Configuration Management Netcast Archive Change is dear to the heart of every network and thus every network operator. A Network's requirements are constantly being changed to reflect THE CONSTANT evolution of the internet and usage patterns. Although the network's implementation is readily modified, network documentation is rarely updated to reflect the newly implement requirements. This lack of documentation, in conjunction with low level granularity of the configuration commands, forces unfamiliar operators to expend more time while making future changes. The lack of documentation also makes the network more vulnerable to misconfigurations due to inconsistent changes. We have developed a set of tools that reverse engineers documentation for a network from its configuration files. Our tools extract documentation in the following three ways: 1) high level policies in the form of constraints placed on communication between users 2) related configurations commands across files in the form of mined configuration templates, and finally 3) dependent configuration commands within and across files in the form of referential links. We have run our tools on several educational networks with varying levels of success. We would also love to have you run our tools and tell us what you think. Any suggestions and feedback on how our tool might be more applicable to your configuration needs are welcomed.