Winter 2009 ESCC/Internet2 Joint Techs

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Enabling Collaboration for Global-Scale Science

Time 02/02/09 02:40PM-03:00PM

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Session Abstract

Major science projects including the LHC, LIGO, GLAST and many
others rely on collaborative systems for videoteleconferencing and data sharing on a daily basis. This reliance persists through all phases of the experimental program, from the original conception and design, to construction and commissioning, to the extraction of results and discoveries.

Meeting the needs of these projects for collaborative work has
aspects which go beyond the commercial systems now on the market, including: global scalability and the ability to integrate across the full range of working environments from the desktop/laptop to conference and control rooms and auditoria, increasing quality while adapting to variable network conditions and efficient use of CPU and GPU processing power, and low cost of the equipment and operational manpower needed to support thousands of scientists at sites around the world.

I will present the technical requirements and methods for a solution to this critical set of issues, and refer to the current status and development path of the EVO (Enabling Virtual Organizations) system, and its autonomous real-time communications infrastructure, which has been deployed and operated by the Caltech team to meet these needs, building on developments of the last 14 years.

Speakers

Speaker Harvey Newman California Institute of Technology

Speaker Dave Adamczyk California Institute of Technology

Presentation Media

media item thumbnail Enabling Collaboration for Global-Scale Science (pdf)

Speaker Dave Adamczyk California Institute of Technology

Speaker Tom Vest Eyeconomics

Session Media

media item thumbnail Enabling Collaboration for Global-Scale Science Netcast Archive Major science projects including the LHC, LIGO, GLAST and many others rely on collaborative systems for videoteleconferencing and data sharing on a daily basis. This reliance persists through all phases of the experimental program, from the original conception and design, to construction and commissioning, to the extraction of results and discoveries. Meeting the needs of these projects for collaborative work has aspects which go beyond the commercial systems now on the market, including: global scalability and the ability to integrate across the full range of working environments from the desktop/laptop to conference and control rooms and auditoria, increasing quality while adapting to variable network conditions and efficient use of CPU and GPU processing power, and low cost of the equipment and operational manpower needed to support thousands of scientists at sites around the world. I will present the technical requirements and methods for a solution to this critical set of issues, and refer to the current status and development path of the EVO (Enabling Virtual Organizations) system, and its autonomous real-time communications infrastructure, which has been deployed and operated by the Caltech team to meet these needs, building on developments of the last 14 years. media item thumbnail Enabling Collaboration for Global-Scale Science Netcast Archive Major science projects including the LHC, LIGO, GLAST and many others rely on collaborative systems for videoteleconferencing and data sharing on a daily basis. This reliance persists through all phases of the experimental program, from the original conception and design, to construction and commissioning, to the extraction of results and discoveries. Meeting the needs of these projects for collaborative work has aspects which go beyond the commercial systems now on the market, including: global scalability and the ability to integrate across the full range of working environments from the desktop/laptop to conference and control rooms and auditoria, increasing quality while adapting to variable network conditions and efficient use of CPU and GPU processing power, and low cost of the equipment and operational manpower needed to support thousands of scientists at sites around the world. I will present the technical requirements and methods for a solution to this critical set of issues, and refer to the current status and development path of the EVO (Enabling Virtual Organizations) system, and its autonomous real-time communications infrastructure, which has been deployed and operated by the Caltech team to meet these needs, building on developments of the last 14 years.