Fall 2005 Internet2 Member Meeting

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Demos

Internet2 Demos for Fall 2005

The following advanced networking applications demonstrations were featured at the Fall 2005 Internet2 Member Meeting, which was held at the Wyndham Philadelphia at Franklin Plaza in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Demo Location: Conference Center Hall
Demo Times: Tuesday, 20 September noon-5:00pm and Wednesday, 21 September 10:00am-5:00pm


Black Squirrel: Content Management at the Click of a Button

Developed by:
Internet2 Netern

Demonstrator:
Andrew Lake

Contact:
Andrew Lake
arl10@albion.edu

Description:
In a nutshell, BlackSquirrel is content management at the click of a button. It allows for the aggregation of XML feeds and the storage of those feeds in a database. Once in the database, through some simple queries users can present information to other parties without the overhead of developing a content management system. BlackSquirrel was originally designed with RSS and digital video in mind, allowing for the description of video feeds, video archives, and video conferences. Also, in the tradition of podcasting, BlackSquirrel facilitates the automatic download of any type of media, and the storage of that media in the same database where it is described. It creates the means to easily describe and store content.

Role of Internet2:
This application was developed as a project of the Internet2 Neternship Program. A wide variety of information types make their way along Abilene's generous bandwidth. BlackSquirrel provides a means to describe, gather, and organize that information into something meaningful to end-users.


From VRVS to EVO: An Infrastructure for Next Generation Collaboration

http://www.vrvs.org

Developed by:
California Institute of Technology

Demonstrators on site:
Philippe Galvez
Pavel Farkas
Dave Adamczyk

Remote Partners:
Pavol Jozef Safarik, University in Kosice

Contact:
Philippe Galvez
galvez@caltech.edu
(626) 395-4017


Harvey Newman
newman@hep.caltech.edu
(626) 395-6656


Gregory Denis
Gregory.Denis@cern.ch
+41-22-767-1585

Funded by:
Department of Energy
National Science Foundation

Description:
This next generation system, EVO, is composed of a Java Client ("Koala" which runs on the client machine and is part of the infrastructure), a Server ("Panda" which is used to create an overlay network and provide an intelligent, secure and reliable communication channel between entities in the collaboration grid), and some other services (scheduler, directory services). Together, they provide a unique set of characteristics that include: Instant Messaging (IM); Rich Presence information; reserved and ad-hoc sessions for both multipoint and point to point modes; adaptive videoconferencing and collaboration experience based on local capacity and network connectivity; friendly statistics, and real-time information. H.323, SIP, Mbone, and AccessGrid/Multicast protocols are all supported and can be deployed on both IPv4 and IPv6 networks. This next generation system provides global academic and research communities with a tool that integrates the best of current technologies in a unique infrastructure.

Role of Internet2:
Internet2 is the main U.S. research and education backbone. It provides very high speed connectivity within U.S. universities, as well as international connectivity. This makes Internet2 a major and very critical collaborator when deploying and running a service for real-time collaboration for the research and academic community. We have currently several VRVS (later EVO) nodes running at several Internet2 sites. It is our intention to continue the deployment widely and take advantage of all the capacity offers by Internet2.


High Definition Video Communications

http://www.lifesize.com/

Developed by:
LifeSize Communications

Demonstrators:
Bob Knauf
Munira Fareed

Contacts:
Maureen Carlson
mcarlson@lifesize.com
(512) 351-4159

Description:
LifeSize is the first company to conceptualize, design and deliver high definition video communications products that provide a productive, true-to-life experience through unparalleled quality (at 1mbps), absolute simplicity, and unprecedented manageability.

LifeSize is working with the Internet2 community where up to 10-times the resolution quality of existing video conferencing systems will help support applications and improved access to remote learning, research and other educational opportunities.

Role of Internet2:
Internet2 provides the networking and bandwidth necessary to support high definition interactive video communications.


Internet2 Commons Collaboration Services

Developed by:
Microsoft Research
Codian
HaiVision
inSORS
Marratech
Radvision
Tandberg
WaveThree

Demonstrators:
Bob Dixon
Megan Troyer
Gabe Moulton
...and a cadre of collaborators

Contact:
Jonathan Tyman
tyman@internet2.edu
734-352-7099

Description:
The Internet2 Commons will demonstrate the many different tools that researchers and educators use for engaging in collaborations over advanced networks. The Internet2 Commons and its partners will preview a proposed “hosting environment” for near production-ready applications which will drive adoption of appropriate technologies while promoting interoperable development. These technologies offer full-spectrum, real-time communications—from presence, chat, voice, and video—to sharing of presentations, large data sets, and computer simulations through a variety of channels and, ultimately, the one that fits your requirements and capabilities best.


Video Over IPv6 Multicast

Developed by:
WIDE Project
Microsoft Research
NYSERNet
New York University
Merit

Demonstrators on site:
Bill Cerveny
Bob Riddle
Bill Owens

Remote Partners:
NYSERNet, New York University, WIDE, Internet2

Contact:
Bill Cerveny
cerveny@internet2.edu
(734) 352-7018

Description:
This demo is one of the first demonstrations of IPv6 Multicast on the Abilene Network. Two of the first video applications capable of utilizing IPv6 Multicast, the WIDE Project's DVTS and Microsoft's ConferenceXP, will also be showcased.


Live Video Delivery from the Aquarius Underwater Medical Research Habitat

Developed by:
VBrick, NASA, NOAA

Demonstrators:
Rich Mavrogeanes
Mike Savic

Contact:
Mike Savic
mikes@vbrick.com
(203) 303-0101
Rich Mavrogeanes

Description:
The purpose of NEEMO program, which is managed by NASA's United Space Alliance, is to put astronauts in an environment that in effect replicates the conditions they will experience in space. They use the Aquarius, an underwater habitat situated off the coast of Key Largo, Florida, and operated by the National Undersea Research Center (NURC) of the University of North Carolina at Wilmington for the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), for training.

VBricks will be used to provide both one way and two way video from shore to the Aquarius. In this demonstration the video will be sent via the Internet2 network from Key Largo, FL to the Internet2 Fall Member Meeting location in Philadelphia.

Role of Internet2:
The Internet2 will be used for key communications and research by NASA and NOAA. It will also be used to multicast key research events to universities and colleges.


Media Streaming to Consumer-Grade Devices

http://www.researchchannel.org/projects/
Developed by:
ResearchChannel

Demonstrators:
Mike Wellings
Chris Latham
Myke Smith

Contact:
Chris Latham
clatham@washington.edu
(206) 221.7108


Mike Wellings
wellings@washington.edu
(206) 543.9922

Description:
Presentations will present both high and low speed multicast streaming. They will demonstrate several techniques for media streaming to consumer grade devices. High Definition video will be shown at multiple bit rates (20 mb/s and 6 mb/s) using commercially available technologies.

An example of a package of website functionality and streaming technology developed for broadcast radio station KEXP's low speed audio streaming will be presented. Audio and video streams will be demonstrated on PDAs and cell phones.

Role of Internet2:
These demonstrations are multicast.


Metaarchive for Multimedia Assets

http://videoserver.cesnet.cz/videoarchiv_en.php

Developed by:
CESNET

Demonstrator:
Michal Krsek

Remote partners:
Jyxo, s.r.o.

Contact:
Michal Krsek
Michal.Krsek@cesnet.cz
+420 2 2435 2945

Funded by:
National Library of Medicine
CSIRO

Description:
The Metaarchive for Multimedia Assets on the Internet can be used to search all videoarchives within a specified domain (gTLD, regional). This system searches videoarchives with a special focus on academic/research resources. It can be easily implemented on all research webs.

Role of Internet2:
Internet2 members have huge video archives. There are some projects (like Digital Well) that integrate some of content to one system. Our system enables all users search in all media assets available on the web.


OSTN : Multi-Channel Programming Over IP

http://www.ostn.tv/index.shtm

Developed by:
Open Student Television Network (OSTN)

Demonstrators:
Rich Griffin
Bob Riddle
Randy Winchester
Jeff Gumpf

Contact:
Rich Griffin - VP of Technology, OSTN
rich_griffin@ostn.tv
(216) 791-6469

Funded by:
CampusEAI Consortium

Partners:
OARnet, Polycom, RADVISION, First Virtual Corporation, Wave Three Software, VCON, VRVS, Access Grid, inSORS, LoCI, and Marratech

Description:
The OSTN IP Television System utilizes advanced networking technologies to provide rich media multicast programming over Internet2 to, potentially all, Internet2 Member Institutions. For the first time, a single centralized IP Cable head end can provide multi-channel programming to any Internet2 Member Institution.

Role of Internet2:
Internet2 plays an integral role in the deployment of this OSTN IP Television System; providing high bandwidth, multicast, IPv6 and a level of QoS which is required for mass distribution of both Standard and High Definition programming to any Internet2 Member Institution.


PerfSonar: Managing Multi-Domain Network Performance Information

Developed by:
University of Delaware, DANTE/GÉANT2, Internet2

Demonstrator:
Jason Zurawski

Contact:
Jason Zurawski
zurawski@eecis.udel.edu
302-230-1197

Description:
The PerfSonar project is creating an interface capable of gathering and managing the storage and retrieval of network performance information from various high-performance networks.

By leveraging a service-oriented architecture, relevant performance information is transformed into a well defined XML structure used for both transmission and storage. Grid enabled technologies enable lookup and discovery of PerfSonar repositories to facilitate the growth and sharing of performance measurements for advanced network-aware applications as well as management applications.

Role of Internet2:
Internet2 is participating in this project.


Digital Anatomy: New Applications and Infrastructure to Support Instruction

http://ianatomy.stanford.edu
http://havnet.stanford.edu

Developed by:
Stanford University
University of Wisconsin - La Crosse

Demonstrators on site:
Parvati Dev
Steven Senger

Remote partners:
SUMMIT
University of Michigan

Contact:
Parvati Dev
parvati@stanford.edu
(650) 723-8087

Steven Senger
senger@cs.uwlax.edu
(608) 785-8387

Funded by:
National Library of Medicine

Description:
This demonstration will show multiple applications developed by Stanford University and the University of Wisconsin - La Crosse as a part of National Library of Medicine funded projects. The applications support various forms of anatomical instruction and include stereo visualization, haptic feedback and wireless handhelds. In addition to the applications themselves the demonstration will highlight the supporting infrastructure that allows applications to discover remote services, form collaborating groups of applications as well as log and monitor network performance characteristics. This demonstration is intended to supplement the Digital Anatomy BoF (Tuesday, 9/20, 7-9 PM) and will provide attendees with a hands-on opportunity to explore the applications and infrastructure.

Role of Internet2:
These applications, by virtue of their tightly-coupled interaction between multiple users and remote computation through multiple data streams, require the predictable bandwidth and latency characteristics of Internet2.