Fall 2003 Internet2 Member Meeting

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Demos

Internet2 Demos for Fall 2003

The following advanced networking applications demonstrations were featured at the Fall 2003 Internet2 Member Meeting, October 13-16, in Indianapolis, IN. The demos took place at the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown in meeting rooms 9 & 10. The demo hours were:

  • Tuesday, October 14, 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
  • Wednesday, October 15, 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

The following demos were featured:

In addition, attendees at the October 15 evening gala reception (held at the Dean & Barbara White Auditorium in the Indiana State Museum ) saw the following performance-oriented demonstrations:


e-VLBI Over High-Performance Networks

http://web.haystack.edu/e-vlbi/evlbi.html

Developed by:

MIT Haystack Observatory

Demonstrator:

David Lapsley

Contact:

David Lapsley
dlapsley@haystack.mit.edu
(781) 981-5951

Partners:

Arecibo Observatory, National Astronomy and Ionosphere Center of Cornell University, Puerto Rico
Australia Telescope National Facility, Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Sydney, Australia
Communications Research Laboratory, Kashima, Japan
Goddard Geophysical and Astronomical Observatory, Goddard Space Flight Center, NASA, Greenbelt, MD
Joint Institute for VLBI in Europe, The Netherlands
MIT Haystack Observatory, Westford, MA
Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (Submillimeter Array), Mauna Kea, HI

Funded by:

National Science Foundation

Description:

Very-Long-Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) has been used by radio astronomers for the last 30 years as one of the most powerful techniques for studying objects in the universe at ultra-high resolution and measuring earth motions with ultra-high accuracy. The transmission of astronomical VLBI data via high-performance networks is dubbed ‘e-VLBI’. The potential advantages for scientific productivity and technical operations of e-VLBI over traditional VLBI are: faster turnaround of results, higher sensitivity of observations, lower costs, and quick diagnostics and tests.

Role of Internet2:

Internet2 networks provide the high-performance networking technology required to enable the realization of high-speed, high-bandwidth e-VLBI. Internet2 is providing high-speed connectivity to VLBI sites within the US as well as internationally. Prior to Internet2, high data rate VLBI relied exclusively on the transport of magnetic storage media from telescope site to correlation site. With the advent of Internet2 and other global high speed networks, near gigabit per second e-VLBI experiments have been possible and scientists have been able to take the first steps towards realizing production level e-VLBI. In addition to Internet2's Abilene network—APAN/Transpac, DREN, and SURFnet networks are also used in conjunction with this demo (as well as GLOWnet and BOSSnet, MIT Haystack Observatory's local connections into Abilene).


Integrating Web Collaboration and Instant Messaging with Desktop Videoconferencing

http://www.polycom.com/products_services/0,1816,pw-4733,00.html
http://www.polycom.com/common/flash/weboffice.swf

Developed by:

Polycom Network Systems

Demonstrators:

Phil Marechal
Michael Baker

Contact:

Phil Marechal
phil.marechal@polycom.com
(408) 474-2710

Description:

Polycom will demonstrate how high-quality desktop video—with full integration into a web collaboration client, including instant messaging—can be used to supplement Internet2 Commons videoconferencing services.

Role of Internet2:

Desktop applications for videoconferencing are merging with web collaboration tools. Participants in the Internet2 Commons can take advantage of these technologies to integrate high-quality video with web collaboration and instant messaging. This enables the Internet2 Commons to extend interactive access to any user with a web browser, allowing those participants to join a videoconference using a simple buddy list. It can also use the Internet2 Commons MCU (multipoint control unit) to create instant multipoint calls.


Internet-To-Go: A Small Mobile High-Speed Internet Access System

http://satellite.oar.net/

Developed by:

Ohio State University
OARnet

Demonstrators:

Bob Dixon
Megan Crabb
Gabe Moulton

Contact:

Bob Dixon
dixon.8@osu.edu
(614) 292-1638

Funded by:

American Distance Education Consortium

Description:

Internet-To-Go is a small trailer that carries a satellite dish and all related electronic systems necessary to provide high-speed access to Internet2 advanced networks, and the commodity Internet, from any location in North America and Europe. The system is designed for setup and use by non-technical people. Internet-To-Go has its own generator that runs for 3 days on a tank of gas, plus battery back-up and shore power hook-up capability. It has wired and 802.11b wireless LAN systems that provide connectivity to local computers, and can penetrate through walls into buildings. In addition, Internet-To-Go acts like a cell tower for its Internet telephone system. Internet-To-Go is being used in many distance learning activities and research applications, such as telemedicine. Internet-To-Go has also made appearances at special events and conferences.

Role of Internet2:

Internet2 advanced networks provide the high-speed, high-quality connectivity needed for advanced applications such as videoconferencing. Internet-To-Go extends that functionality to hard-to-network places, so all the advantages of high-performance networking are no longer limited to locations with wired ground connectivity.


The Internet2 Commons Videoconferencing Service via H.323

Developed by:

Internet2 Member Collaboration

Demonstrators:

Members of the Internet2 Commons Management Team and Remote Site Coordinators

Contact:

Jonathan Tyman
tyman@internet2.edu
(734) 352-7099

Partner:

OARnet

Description:

The Internet2 Commons multi-site videoconferencing service will demonstrate MCU-based H.323 videoconferencing. Live over IP connections will include ongoing Member Meeting track sessions, visits with Site Coordinators throughout our membership who use the service, and interaction with the Internet-To-Go remote satellite trailer demo. This is a great opportunity to see first-hand the benefits of face-to-face videoconferencing through the shared resources of the Internet2 Commons Videoconferencing Service via H.323.

Role of Internet2:

Internet2 members have driven the creation, development, and deployment of this service, including operations, training, and ongoing management. Internet2 networks provide the bandwidth necessary for large-scale deployment of reliable videoconferencing.


Interworking H.323 and SIP in the Next Generation IP Video Telephony

http://www.radvision.com/

Developed by:

RADVISION

Demonstrators:

Adi Regev
Bryant Morris

Contact:

Peter Benedict
pbenedict@radvision.com
(201) 689-6311

Description:

This demonstration will highlight some of the latest IP-based videoconferencing and video telephony applications and technologies. Some of the new technologies demonstrated will include multimedia processing, transcoding, the latest gatekeeper functionality (new ECS), and full H.323/SIP interworking. In addition, demonstrations highlighting the use of H.323 endpoint and SIP-based end points (Windows Messenger) in point-to-point and multipoint conferencing will also be featured. The demonstration will also include a look at RADVISION's new MS Outlook scheduling tool and ECS IP gatekeeper.

Role of Internet2:

The high bandwidth of Internet2 advanced networks is required to support the new video telephony and videoconferencing applications and functionalities that will comprise the next generation of interactive collaboration tools.


Intrusion Prevention Systems and Piracy Prevention Tools

http://www.tippingpoint.com/

Developed by:

TippingPoint Technologies

Demonstrator:

Don Ward

Contact:

Laura Parker
lparker@tippingpoint.com
(512) 681-8441

Description:

TippingPoint Technologies provides solutions for high-speed, network-based intrusion prevention and piracy prevention. TippingPoint will demonstrate UnityOne, a suite of intrusion prevention appliances and systems. UnityOne protects networks from cyber threats, piracy, and bandwidth abuse—providing in-depth protection and attack eradication at multiple gigabits per second with microsecond latencies. UnityOne utilizes custom hardware and ASIC-based processors to perform total packet inspection on Layers 3-7.

UnityOne protected several university customers from recent worms and cyber threats, such as: University of North Carolina, University of Miami Medical Center, Regis University, University of Texas Health Sciences Center, University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics, Southwest Texas State University, University of Dayton, and Texas Tech Health Sciences Center.

Role of Internet2:

Through Internet2 corporate membership, we will leverage Internet2 Working Groups and other member activities to provide feedback and input for improving our products and bring new products to the marketplace.


Live Medical Lecture Broadcasts over Internet2

Developed by:

University of California
VBrick Systems

Demonstrators:

Mike Savic
Mark Perry

Contact:

Mike Savic
mikes@vbrick.com
(203) 303-0101

Description:

The University of California at San Diego, University of California at Davis, and VBrick Systems will demonstrate the ability to stream both live and recorded events over Internet2 advanced networks from the west coast to Indianapolis. These streams will include the Med Ed Hour from UC Davis. This broadcast features a variety of medical programs for physicians, nurses and other health care professionals who wish to expand their knowledge base, keep current on the latest research, and, in some cases, earn Continuing Medical Education credits. To stream the events over Internet2 networks, both MPEG-2 and MPEG-4 encoders will be used at compression rates from 56 Kbps to 10 Mbps. In addition to the medical content, archived recordings from live concerts and other performances will also be streamed to demonstrate the high-fidelity sound quality possible using this technology. The demo will show several live streams ranging from commodity Internet quality (MPEG-4) to full DVD quality (MPEG-2) and member meeting attendees can view the streams on a variety of devices, including TVs, PCs, and even wireless PDAs.

Role of Internet2:

For this demonstration, Internet2 advanced networks will be used to carry the live and recorded events from California to Indianapolis. The Med Ed Hour program medical lectures at UC Davis are encoded using MPEG-2 codecs (VBrick 6200), which are connected to Internet2 networks. The compressed video is transported over Internet2 networks to the UC San Diego campus and then to UCTV in La Jolla. At UCTV the compressed video and audio is decoded and switched to various broadcast equipment (CATV, Satellite, etc.). The video and audio is also re-encoded using MPEG-4 (VBrick VBXcast) and MPEG-2 (VBrick 6200) encoders. Streams from both encoders are multicast over Internet2 networks for distance learning, research, and entertainment purposes. Viewers without Internet2 connectivity can also watch the streams over the commodity Internet using standard software decoders, such as Apple QuickTime, RealPlayer, and WindowsMedia.


NLANR Performance Advisor

http://dast.nlanr.net/Projects/Advisor/

Developed by:

National Laboratory for Applied Network Research (NLANR)

Demonstrators:

Tanya Brethour
Jim Ferguson

Contact:

Tanya Brethour
brethour@ncsa.uiuc.edu
(217) 333-3019

Funded by:

National Science Foundation

Description:

Tools to enhance network performance are not a novel concept, yet many users still struggle to achieve the full potential of their networks. While consulting the advice of a network engineer is the ideal solution, it is not always a possibility. Therefore, users can now consult "the Advisor." Developed by the NLANR Distributed Applications Support Team, the Advisor is a simple, yet sophisticated, open source application that measures, displays, and analyzes network metrics. It uses existing diagnostic tools such as ping, traceroute, Iperf, and Web100 and integrates them into a common framework. This framework attempts to emulate a networking expert, and allows users to troubleshoot their own networking problems. Additional tools and analyses are simple to add. Additionally, the Advisor is well designed in that specific components that expose performance data may be separated, and customized, or integrated into other applications.

Role of Internet2:

Since June 2002, the NLANR-DAST group has collaborated with the Internet2 End-to-End Performance Improvement Performance Environment System (piPEs). The two projects are very similar in that both aim to gather measurement data between two computers on a network using existing network tools. However, they are different in that the Advisor is focused on the end-user by analyzing the network for them and providing solutions in the form of plain-text advice. The Advisor will tap into the Internet2 piPEs project by accessing network performance metrics gathered on nodes within the Abilene Network and use those metrics for analysis. In addition, the Internet2 piPEs project may integrate the Advisor's graphical user interface and analysis engine into their network performance tools.


Rich Presence

Developed by:

Internet2 Presence and Integrated Communications (PIC) Working Group

Demonstrators:

Members of the PIC Working Group

Contact:

Jeremy George
jeremy.george@yale.edu
(203) 436-4507

Partners:

Columbia University
Ford Motor Company
Hewlett-Packard
Indiana University
iptel.org/FhG-Fokus
Texas A&M University
University of Pennsylvania
Yale University
Wave Three Software

Description:

This demonstration is participatory, distributed, and experimental. Participants download and install one of several integrated communications clients on their laptops. These clients allow participants to initiate voice, instant messaging, and video calls to each other using the receiver's email address as a single, converged electronic identity.

Communication is enhanced through the inclusion of rich presence services, through which participants may see not only who is online, but also where they are and what they are doing. As participants connect to the wireless LAN, their location and calendar presence is updated automatically. Room location is derived through triangulation of 802.11 signals and is cross-referenced with the meeting calendar to learn the name and duration of the session in that room at that time.

Users may also experience placing SIP voice calls to any user at a SIP.edu-enabled institution and may eavesdrop on any member meeting session by initiating voice communication to a "room buddy."

Because this demonstration is experimental, what you'll see at the Fall Member Meeting may differ from the description above. The latest status, technical documentation, and instructions for participating may be found at http://pic.internet2.edu/

Role of Internet2:

Internet2 has been key to the formation of the Presence and Integrated Communications (PIC) Working Group, which is working to foster the deployment of network-based communication technologies through demonstrations, tutorials, and initiatives in collaboration with both the private sector and open-source initiatives.
.


Session Communication Software: Advanced Communication Tools for Research and Education

http://www.wave3software.com/

Developed by:

Wave Three Software, Inc.

Demonstrator:

James Schwartz

Contact:

Colin Baier
cbaier@wave3software.com
(858) 404-5500

Description:

Session(TM) communication software is a suite of applications that includes Session desktop software and Session Conference Server software. Session desktop software integrates Voice over IP, Video over IP, application sharing, and media sharing into a single desktop solution. The Session Conference Server delivers group conferencing on a server-based platform. The software supports group conferencing for voice, video, data, or all three simultaneously. The Conference Server architecture is a flexible, SIP-based architecture for group communication, including conference management services, call control services, and multimedia services.

Role of Internet2:

Internet2 advanced networks are a critical component in maximizing the impact of Session™ software in that access to higher bandwidth promises reduced artifacts and better human factors than are possible on the commodity Internet. Wave Three is participating in the activities of the Internet2 Voice over IP, Presence and Integrated Communications, and VidMid working groups, as well as the Digital Video Initiative.


Streaming Media Applications: How Bandwidth Affects User Experience

http://www.researchchannel.org/

Developed by:

ResearchChannel

Demonstrators:

Tim Lorang
Michael Wellings
Gates Rhodes
Karen Howell

Contact:

Kathleen McMonigal
kmcm@cac.washington.edu
(206) 616-5002

Description:

Streaming media applications have changed expectations and video content is now a basic expectation for web sites. Access to adequate network bandwidth directly impacts the experience of these web site users as does the production quality of the content provided, encoding schemes and client software used for viewing. The ResearchChannel demonstration will dramatically illustrate how content capture tools, varying bit rates for transmission, and differing encoding schemes impact the quality of users' experience in sharing research, developing curriculum for student
learning, and creating public outreach tools.

Production quality video will be transmitted over Internet2 to University of Washington for encoding, providing comparison and viewing of the following formats:

  • High Definition
  • VideoFurnace MPEG-2 System
  • VideoLAN MPEG-2 freeware
  • AMNIS MPEG-2 System
  • DV/IP
  • Windows Media - multiple bit rates
  • Real
  • Quicktime

Visitors to the demonstration can select among multiple cameras and view the resulting live streams in various formats and bit rates—immediately comparing camera quality and streaming engines.

Role of Internet2:

ResearchChannel demonstrations of multiple encoding rates and delivery of the same content over various bandwidths illustrate the stunning differences that advanced networks provide and users expect. Experiments in content capture further demonstrate improvements in the resources available for teaching and learning. New technology has created lower cost options for capturing and encoding streaming media content.


Video Wall

http://vsee.stanford.edu/wall/

Developed by:

Stanford University

Demonstrators:

Milton Chen, Stanford University
Art Recesso, University of Georgia
Bob Bradford, NASA
Chris Golden, Indiana University
Doug Pearson, Indiana University
Matthew Joyce, Manhattan College

Contact:

Milton Chen
Milton.Chen@cs.stanford.edu
(650) 725-3648

Partners:

Ford Motor Company
American Honda Motor Co
Hewlett-Packard
Intel
NASA
Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications, China
Indiana University
Lulea University of Technology, Sweden
Manhattan College
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Saint Francis University
Tele-University of Quebec, Canada
Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil
University of California at Berkeley
University of California at San Francisco
University of Georgia
University of Hawaii
University of Iceland, Iceland
University of Michigan
University of Texas at El Paso
University of Washington
York University, Canada

Description:

This demo will feature a video wall showing up to 80 simultaneous, high-quality video streams originating from several Internet2 members. For the demo, five groups of participants will each bring a Pentium 4 laptop and a portable projector. The Video Wall will be pieced together using the outputs of the 5 projectors and innovative plug-and-show video streaming software, which can accommodate up to 80 streams. The ultimate goal for this demo would be to see the over 200 Internet2 university members simultaneously using the video wall.

If you would like to contribute a live feed for the Video Wall demo, please send email to Milton Chen <Milton.Chen@cs.stanford.edu >.

Role of Internet2:

This demo is only possible using Internet2 advanced networks. Today's commercial videoconferencing systems can only display four simultaneous video streams due to network limitations; using Internet2 advanced networks, we will show as many as 80 concurrent video streams (at the same visual quality as high-end commercial videoconferencing systems).


VoIP Disaster Recovery Trial

Developed by:

Georgetown University

Demonstrators:

Members of the Internet2 VoIP Working Group

Contact:

Chris Peabody
peabodyc@georgetown.edu
(202) 687-1394

Partners:

PaeTec Communications, Inc.
Mid-Atlantic Crossroads (MAX)
BroadSoft

Description:

Increasingly, University voice and data networks must be engineered for high survivability during catastrophic events that may involve partial or complete communications infrastructure failure. The Internet2 Voice over IP (VoIP) Working Group is testing solutions to provide the higher education community with comprehensive voice services availability.

Internet2’s Abilene backbone network represents a high capacity, extremely resilient data infrastructure that can offer an alternative pathway for communication in disaster scenarios. Internet telephony can be used to supplement a university's circuit-switched telephone system to provide an increased level of survivability. Georgetown University has partnered with BroadSoft, PaeTec Communications Inc., and the Mid-Atlantic Crossroads (MAX), to test and demonstrate an emergency IP voice service for Internet2 members.

The initial design consists of two BroadWorks nodes deployed in physically separate locations (with a primary node at Georgetown University and a secondary node at Texas A&M to provide geographic redundancy). SIP phones are deployed on campuses to serve as emergency endpoints, replacing existing back up POTS (Plain Old Telephone Service) lines provided by the LEC (Local Exchange Carrier). SIP gateways are deployed within PaeTec POPs in College Park, MD and Boston, MA. The SIP gateways provide inter-working to the PSTN (Public Switched Telephone Network) for inbound and outbound calls. This design provides a comprehensive disaster recovery voice service in the event of an equipment failure at the customer premises, compromised PSTN connectivity or even a catastrophic central office loss. Organizations that are currently participating include the University of Pennsylvania, Texas A&M University, Harvard University, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Catholic University, DC Government and Boston University.

Role of Internet2:

Disaster recovery is a question we all face. In a situation where the PSTN or access to it is not operating, we expect that Internet2 advanced networks—combined with the functionality of the BroadSoft VoIP software and PaeTec's distributed network—will serve as the VoIP transport network to connect members who have lost their voice access. This solution will allow Internet2 members to draw dial tone from other member locations.


Antiphonal Music, Network Latency, and Historical Performance Practice

Demo Location: Dean & Barbara White Auditorium in the Indiana State Museum

Developed by:

Indiana University
Case Western Reserve University

Demonstrators from Indiana University:

Darrell Bailey
Steve Egyhazi
Wendy Gillespie
Sam A. Falk Milosevich
Kathryn Montoya
Doug Pearson
Kim Walker
Faculty and Students of the Indiana University School of Music

Performers from Indiana University:

Juan Carlos Arango
Charles Keith Collins
Anna Marsh
Kathryn Montoya

Demonstrators from Case Western Reserve University:

Jared Bendis
Ross Duffin
Thomas Knab
Debra Nagy
Faculty and Students of the Case Western Reserve University Department of Music
Case New Media Studio, MediaVision, and Center of Excellence for Advanced Network Applications in the Arts

Performers from Case Western Reserve University:

Debra Nagy
Doug Miliken
Jeffrey Quick
Brad Schwartz

Contacts:

Doug Pearson
dodpears@indiana.edu
(812) 855-3846

Thomas Knab
tjk11@cwru.edu
(216) 795-3185

Partners:

Barco
Yamaha
Commercial Audio
The Cleveland Institute of Music

Description:

Antiphonal music contains short themes, phrases or melodies that echo, alternate, or respond to one another. In antiphonal singing, performers are divided into physically separated groups, such as the front of a church and the balcony at the rear, and sing alternately in a call and response fashion. Antiphonal music often exploits the acoustics of large churches. At room temperature, sound travels 1129 feet per second. Choirs separated by a few hundred feet, at the front and balcony of a large cathedral, experience one-way audio delays on the order of 180ms (milliseconds). In the 17th century, the Italian composer Giovanni Gabrieli composed choral and instrumental music to deliberately exploit the acoustics of St. Mark's Cathedral in Venice for brilliant antiphonal and echo effects.

Data networks possess inherent one-way delays (latency) as well. Network latency arises from the effects of transmission time and network queuing. Transmission time is constrained by the speed of light in optical networks, and the speed of electrical signals in copper. Queuing occurs in the intermediary network nodes—the routers, that forward data packets along network paths. The latency on Internet2 advanced networks between New York and Los Angeles is approximately 40ms.

When sending video and audio media across a network, the digital media are typically compressed to reduce the amount of data, and therefore the amount of network bandwidth required for transmission. A significant amount of latency is introduced by the technologies to encode and decode media for network transmission. The amount of latency introduced varies with the degree and type of compression. In real-time video communications, average compression-induced latency runs on the order of 100-200ms.

This demonstration will:

  • Provide a visual sense of the latency inherent in the transmission of media over networks.
  • Provide a visual and auditory sense of the effect of latency on the synchronization of music performance.
  • Provide an overview of the antiphonal music style and the acoustics that contribute to effective use of antiphony.
  • Explore the potential for utilizing network latency in antiphonal performance.
  • Explore the potential for utilizing live stereoscopic video and surround sound over IP to enhance the visual and immersive aspects of the performance.
  • Explore a model for global performance practice, with performers dispersed around the world, connected by high-speed networks.

Acoustically separated musicians will attempt synchronous performance across an Internet2 network connection that is manipulated to establish varying levels of latency. The network characteristics of latency, jitter, and loss will be visually represented as the musicians perform. Following the synchronous performance, the musicians will utilize the inherent network latency to provide an antiphonal performance.

The performers, physically located at IU Bloomington and Case Western Reserve's (CWRU) Cleveland campus, will attempt to follow the visual cues of a conductor located in the Indiana State Museum auditorium. Two concurrent point-to-point connections (Bloomington-Indianapolis and Cleveland-Indianapolis), utilizing DV/IP transport at ~30 Mbps, will be established to bring the IU Bloomington and CWRU Cleveland performers together. The mixed audio of the performance will be presented in 5.1 stereo surround sound.

The demonstration will also attempt to present a split-screen passive stereoscopic image of the distant performers. Stereoscopic cameras at the Bloomington and Cleveland locations, precisely aligned to show the remote performers as the left and right sides of a single stage, will be multiplexed and transmitted thru the DV/IP streams.

Role of Internet2:

Internet2 advanced networks provide the high-capacity, low-latency, and low-loss required for network-based musical performance. This type of demonstration would not be possible to conduct over the commodity Internet.


International Distributed Collaboration in the Performing Arts

http://www.digitalworlds.ufl.edu/I2Fall2003/default.htm

Demo Location: Dean & Barbara White Auditorium in the Indiana State Museum

Developed by:

University of Florida

Demonstrators:

Indianapolis

  • Choreographed and performed by: Kelly Drummond Cawthon
  • Composer and Executive Producer: James Oliverio
  • Photography: Sandi Sissel, ASC

University of Florida

  • Technical Director: Andy Quay
  • Producing Director: Joella Walz
  • Art Director: Arturo Sinclair
  • Performance Director: Kelly Drummond Cawthon
  • Assistants to the Directors: Tara Burns, Kelly Gaunt, Meryl Thurston, Pat Pagano, Adam Portnow Choreography by: Shapiro & Smith Dance, Kelly Drummond Cawthon and performers.

New World School of the Arts

  • Directed by: Daniel Lewis, Choreography by: Dale Andre

REUNA (Santiago, Chile)

  • Executive Producer: Florencio Utreras
  • Technical Support Team: Sandra Jaque, Roberto Asfura,
  • Paola Arellano, Maria Jose Lopez Percussionist: Gerardo Salazar

Korean Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST)

  • Executive Producer: Dr. Hyun Yang Network Engineer: Juho Lee

Sejong University (Seoul, Korea)

  • Seon-Hee Jang, Choreography

Performers

Indiana

  • Dance Soloist: Kelly Drummond Cawthon

University of Florida

  • Dancers: Tara Burns, Matthew Reeves, Everlea Bryant, Melissa Canto, Kendall Dupree, Polly Hurlburt, Colette Krogal, Philip Montana, Courtney Smith
  • Musicians: Ken Broadway, Cliff Sutton, Kristen Stoner, Jenny Kampmeier, Kira Bokalders, Margot Stern, Brent Swanson

New World School of the Arts

  • Dancers: Taisha Cole, Melodie Gonzales, Lloyd Knight, Leah Verier-Dunn, Miguel Quinones

Red Universitaria Nacional (REUNA)

  • Musician: Gerardo Salazar

Sejong University

  • Dancers: Moon-Suk Choi, Young-Chan Lee, Eun-Ji Choi, Eun-Jin Lee, Ji-Won Kim

Contact:

James Oliverio
oliverio@ufl.edu
(352) 294-2020

Partners:

Korean Advanced Institute of Technology (KAIST)
Red Universitaria Nacional (REUNA)
New World School of the Arts (NWSA)
University of Florida Digital Worlds Institute (UFDWI)
VBrick Systems

Description:

This demonstration will feature a distributed collaborative process between participants in three continents. During the Seoul International Dance Festival, artists in Korea will join with performers in North and South America to demonstrate how telepresence can effectively empower multi-national collaborations in the performing arts. The piece is entitled "NON DIVISI", a musical term meaning "not divided". This demo is part of the ongoing work of the University of Florida’s Digital Worlds (DW) Institute in growing an international network of Access Grid nodes and Internet2 members interested in creating new works of multi-national music and dance.

Role of Internet2:

International, real-time collaborations such as those demonstrated here would not be possible without the high-bandwidth connectivity and advanced services provided by Internet2's Abilene Network.